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21 Mar, 2023
2 min time to read

It seems that Twitter is experimenting with a fresh verification procedure for Twitter Blue members, which would require them to provide a government-issued ID.

Insights from analyzing Twitter's code indicate that a new feature may be in development that allows users to verify their accounts by uploading a photo of their government-issued ID and a selfie. This feature is expected to be part of Twitter Blue, a paid subscription service that offers perks like editing tweets, uploading longer videos, and organizing bookmarks.

Although the feature was discovered by product intelligence firm Watchful.ai, it's uncertain whether it is being tested externally or not. Watchful.ai believes the feature is in testing in the U.S., where it was found in the Android version of the Twitter app. However, it's unknown whether any Twitter users have access to the feature at this time.

Twitter previously changed its verification process to allow users to pay for a verification checkmark, which led to issues with impersonation. Although the revamped system requires a phone number to become verified, it's still vulnerable to impersonation. Twitter's verification process doesn't require a photo ID, which allowed a reporter to add a verified blue badge to a fake account claiming to be that of a U.S. senator.

Introducing a photo ID and selfie requirement as part of Twitter Blue's verification process could help to reduce the risk of impersonation. However, some people believe that verification should be a service provided to the community rather than a paid offering.

Meta, Twitter's parent company, recently launched paid verification on Facebook and Instagram in the U.S. Its system allows users to buy the blue checkmark for a monthly fee and provides impersonation protection and direct access to customer support. If Twitter publicly launches a government ID-based verification feature, it would be a notable change to its current system, which focuses on giving Twitter Blue subscribers increased visibility on the platform. However, it's important to note that even with a government ID, it doesn't necessarily indicate that the user is who they claim to be.