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  • btc = $66 451.00 2 612.88 (4.09 %)

  • eth = $3 488.18 71.76 (2.10 %)

  • ton = $7.31 0.03 (0.37 %)

2 Jul, 2024
1 min time to read

A team of scientists from Tianjin University and the Southern University of Science and Technology in China has created a robot controlled by a tiny organoid made from human stem cells.

This innovative creation allows the robot to get and perform certain tasks by connecting brain tissue to a neural interface, which transmits instructions to the robot body.

The researchers aim to explore brain-computer interfaces that mediate between electrical brain signals and computing power. They claim this is the "world’s first open-source brain-on-chip intelligent complex information interaction system."

The organoids, formed from human pluripotent stem cells, have the potential to differentiate into various cell types, including brain tissues. While the researchers provided images showing pink blobs resembling brain matter, these are mockups, and the actual organoids are much smaller.

Beyond enabling a robot to avoid obstacles or grip objects, scientists hope that organoids might one day repair human brain damage through transplantation. The research remains in its early stages, with many questions yet to be answered, such as whether damaged brain tissues can be effectively repaired using organoids.

In related research, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania successfully inserted human neurons into the brains of rats with damaged visual cortices, reviving some affected areas to respond to external stimuli. The Chinese researchers further treated organoids with low-intensity ultrasound to facilitate their integration into the human brain, showing promise in supporting network formation within the host.

Although the field is still developing, these advancements indicate a potential future where lab-grown brain tissue could restore brain functions, bridging the gap between organoids and computing interfaces.