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  • btc = $58 642.00 569.27 (0.98 %)

  • eth = $3 152.08 13.32 (0.42 %)

  • ton = $7.32 0.01 (0.14 %)

23 Sep, 2023
1 min time to read

Google has unveiled a new feature in the Android 14 beta that allows users to utilize their Android smartphones as webcams when connected to a laptop or desktop computer via USB.

This feature is Google's response to Apple's Continuity Camera and aims to enhance the video conferencing experience for Android users.

The Android 14 QPR1 Beta 1 update, released for supported Pixel devices, includes this capability. Unlike third-party apps or software, Google's native webcam feature offers a seamless and straightforward solution for users looking to leverage their smartphone's superior camera quality for video calls and meetings.

To access the webcam functionality, users need to connect their Android device to a computer using a USB cable. After connecting, they can access the "Charging this device via USB" option in the notification tray. Within this option, users can switch to the "Webcam" feature under the "Use USB for" section. The feature provides on-screen instructions for configuring the webcam feed, including options to zoom in/out and switch between the device's front and rear cameras.

While third-party apps like EpocCam and DroidCam have offered similar functionality in the past, Google's native integration eliminates the need for additional software, making it a convenient and cost-effective solution. Smartphone cameras often outperform built-in laptop webcams, and this feature provides an easy way to enhance the quality of video streams and virtual meetings.

It's important to note that the current implementation requires a physical USB connection, which differs from Apple's wireless Continuity Camera feature. However, Google's webcam feature is built on the USB Video Class (UVC) standard, ensuring compatibility across various systems, including Windows, Chromebook, Linux, and Mac.

Initially available for Pixel devices as part of the Android 14 beta, this feature is expected to become available to a wider range of Android smartphones when Android 14 is officially released in October.