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27 Jan, 2023
2 min time to read

The estimated number of vehicles that would be impacted by the proposed rule is 100,000, which operate in the five boroughs.

New York City Mayor Eric Adams announced in his State of the City speech that Uber and Lyft will be required to have zero-emission fleets by 2030. The decision has the potential to impact an estimated 100,000 for-hire vehicles in one of the world's largest markets for app-based ridehailing. Adams stated that the move is an extension of his administration's efforts to electrify the city's fleet of vehicles and install charging infrastructure throughout the five boroughs. The plan will be implemented through the city's Taxi and Limousine Commission, which regulates the for-hire vehicle industry, including Uber and Lyft. Both companies have expressed support for the new requirement.

“We are excited to partner with New York City on our journey,” Paul Augustine, Lyft’s director of sustainability, said in a statement. “New York’s commitment will accelerate an equitable city-wide transition to electric, and we’re eager to collaborate with the TLC on an ambitious plan for a rideshare clean mile standard.”

“We applaud the Mayor’s ambition for reducing emissions, an important goal we share,” Josh Gold, senior director of policy at Uber, said in a statement. “Uber has been making real progress to become the first zero-emissions mobility platform in North America, and there’s much more to do.”

Both Uber and Lyft are taking steps to encourage their drivers to switch to electric vehicles (EVs) by partnering with rental car companies or offering higher fares for EV drivers. Both companies have stated that they aim to have a "100% electric" fleet by 2030. However, transitioning millions of drivers to EVs will not be easy. Many drivers use their personal cars to work for multiple gig economy companies and EVs tend to be more expensive than gas vehicles, making it difficult for drivers who have tight margins to make the switch.

New York is not the first government to require an all-electric ride-hail fleet. California also passed a regulation in 2021 that requires ride-sharing companies to transition to EVs by 2030, a few years before the state plans to ban the sale of new gas cars.