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  • btc = $66 257.00 - 523.81 (-0.78 %)

  • eth = $3 508.29 11.51 (0.33 %)

  • ton = $8.04 0.17 (2.10 %)

11 Dec, 2023
1 min time to read

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has issued a cautionary alert, urging the public to be skeptical about scanning QR codes, as cybercriminals increasingly exploit them for fraudulent activities.

In a recent consumer alerts blog post, the FTC outlined the potential risks associated with QR codes strategically placed by malicious actors to trick unsuspecting individuals into sharing sensitive information, which could result in financial loss or privacy breaches.

According to John Fokker, head of threat analysis at the Trellix company, more than 60,000 cases of attacks using QR codes were recorded in the third quarter of this year alone. Common scams reported by The New York Times include schemes to impersonate payroll and human resources employees, as well as mail fraud. Incidents such as fraudulent QR codes on parking meters directing users to false payment sites have also been reported in Texas cities.

To avoid falling victim to QR code scams, the FTC recommends ignoring unexpected urgent request messages, especially via email or text message. Users are advised to check the URL displayed when the QR code is scanned to make sure it leads to a trustworthy site.

The FTC further emphasizes the importance of keeping devices updated, maintaining strong passwords, and implementing multi-factor authentication for sensitive accounts. While built-in camera apps for Android and iOS can scan QR codes without the need for additional apps, the FTC advises against downloading dedicated QR code scanning apps due to potential security risks.