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7 Dec, 2023
1 min time to read

Mark Zuckerberg announced a significant milestone as Meta initiates the widespread implementation of default end-to-end encryption for Messenger.

In this rollout, personal chats and calls on Messenger will now benefit from default end-to-end encryption, enhancing the privacy and security of user communications. However, it's important to note that encryption for group chats remains an opt-in feature, giving users the flexibility to choose.

The implementation of end-to-end encryption is a pivotal security measure, ensuring that neither Meta nor any third-party entities can access the content of a chat.

The journey to default end-to-end encryption began in 2016 when Meta introduced a limited test of the "secret conversations" mode. The encryption feature was later extended to voice and video calls in 2021, and to group chats in January 2022. The company initiated testing for individual chats' end-to-end encryption in August 2022, with the commitment to roll out default end-to-end encryption by the end of 2023.

Meta, utilizing the Signal protocol for end-to-end encryption, explained on its engineering blog that the long implementation period was necessary because of the comprehensive rebuild of features such as the sticker library and chat repository. With this latest development, Messenger inches closer to achieving full end-to-end protection, aligning it with Meta's chat app WhatsApp.

In addition to this crucial security update, Meta introduces several new features for Messenger users. These include the ability to edit messages up to 15 minutes after sending, speed control for voice messages, new photo and video layouts, a revamped interface for disappearing messages, and ongoing work on enabling the transmission of HD photos and videos on Messenger.