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23 Sep, 2023
1 min time to read

Unity announces its revamped pricing model in response to widespread criticism from the gaming community. Just over a week after unveiling a highly controversial pricing structure, Unity is making significant changes to address developers' concerns.

Under the new plan, users on the Unity Personal subscription plan will no longer be subject to the previously proposed fees. Additionally, Unity will raise the revenue cap for games created with the Unity Personal plan from $100,000 to $200,000.

Perhaps the most significant change is that games generating less than $1 million in revenue within 12 months will not be subjected to the controversial fee. This adjustment provides relief to small game developers who feared increased costs under the original pricing model.

Unity is also revising which games will be subject to the new fee. Initially, it would have applied to games that met specific download and revenue thresholds, both during development and post-release. Now, Unity clarifies that the fee will only apply to games created with the next version of Unity expected to launch in 2024. Games currently in development or already released will not be affected unless developers choose to upgrade them to the new version.

Additionally, Unity is addressing developer concerns by reinstating the ability for developers to use the terms of service (TOS) that correspond to their version of Unity. In 2019, Unity had promised users they could use TOS that matched their version, but this was later revoked. Now, developers can stay on the terms applicable to their version of Unity.

Regarding determining when a game reaches specific download and revenue thresholds, Unity is changing its approach. Previously, it relied on proprietary software without disclosing its workings, causing concern among developers. Now, Unity will allow users to self-report their revenue, removing the reliance on undisclosed software.

Unity's President, Marc Whitten, apologized for poor communication during the rollout of the initial pricing model and acknowledged that the company should have gotten more feedback from the developer community before announcing the changes.