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  • ton = $6.92 -0.25 (-3.53 %)

21 May, 2023
1 min time to read

A team of scientists from Kyoto University and Sumitomo Forestry, a Japanese logging startup, have made a significant breakthrough in sustainable space technology.

After conducting experiments on wood's resilience in space, the researchers have announced their plans to launch a wooden satellite into orbit next year.

The project began in 2020 when the team partnered with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to send three types of wood to the International Space Station (ISS). The goal was to test the durability of each wood type under simulated low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions.

After spending approximately ten months in the ISS's Kibo module, the wood samples were retrieved, and the results were impressive. Magnolia wood, in particular, demonstrated exceptional resilience with no signs of decomposition, deformations, or surface damage. The weight of the wood also remained virtually unchanged throughout the experiment.

The success of the wood's performance in space has opened up new possibilities for sustainable satellite construction. Traditional satellites often contribute to space debris and environmental concerns. By utilizing wooden materials, the scientists aim to mitigate these issues, as wood is a renewable resource and does not release harmful substances when reentering the Earth's atmosphere.