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20 Feb, 2023
1 min time to read

SpaceX is offering a new service to those on its Starlink waitlist in countries where the service is not yet available.

According to PCMag, SpaceX recently began emailing potential customers, offering a $200 per month package that will allow its terminals to provide internet access "from almost anywhere on land in the world." However, it is still unclear how SpaceX plans to follow through on the promise to provide internet access from nearly anywhere in the world, given the company is still waiting to obtain regulatory approval to offer internet access in many key markets, including India and Pakistan.

The email sent to potential customers notes that the global roaming services are "contingent on regulatory approvals." It also states that while the company works to expand its satellite network, customers may experience "brief periods of poor connectivity, or none at all." Those who wish to subscribe to the global roaming service should also be prepared to pay an import fee for their Starlink terminal, on top of the kit's $599 price.

SpaceX already offers a few more limited roaming options, such as the Portability package for existing residential users, which allows them to use their Starlink terminal while traveling within their home continent. This service costs $25 per month on top of the company's $110 monthly subscription fee. However, those who spend "an extended period of time" away from home are required to change their permanent address.

SpaceX's Starlink satellite internet service aims to provide high-speed internet to users around the world. The service has been in beta testing since last year and has already received over 500,000 preorders. With the global roaming service, SpaceX is looking to expand its customer base and make its service available to more people around the world, even if regulatory hurdles remain to be cleared.