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  • btc = $69 223.00 - 579.61 (-0.83 %)

  • eth = $3 825.19 132.45 (3.59 %)

  • ton = $6.35 0.11 (1.75 %)

11 Nov, 2023
1 min time to read

A Texas physics professor, Kenneth Ohm, is making an unconventional move by sending not just his cremated ashes but also his DNA to the Moon's south pole through space company Celestis.

Ohm's unique motivation? He envisions a future where aliens or advanced civilizations might create an "intergalactic zoo" featuring cloned versions of himself or even thousands of "reconstituted Ken Ohms" spreading across the universe. While this may sound like science fiction or a humorous take, the idea of preserving DNA samples for future civilizations, whether terrestrial or extraterrestrial, is not entirely implausible.

Celestis has been sending cremated remains into space for years, catering to customers with various motivations for their celestial memorials. Some have romantic intentions, like sending their ashes alongside a loved one, while others, like aerospace engineer Jeffrey Woytach, have a deep connection to space exploration.

However, Celestis' lunar memorial services have faced delays, with its Tranquility memorial spaceflight still awaiting an official launch date. The company's capsules carrying remains and DNA are intended to remain on the lunar surface as a permanent tribute to those who dreamed of reaching for the stars.

While Kenneth Ohm's vision of an alien zoo might be bizarre, it raises intriguing questions about the possibilities of preserving human genetic material for the future, whether for scientific exploration or imaginative scenarios yet to be realized.