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17 Jul, 2023
1 min time to read

Microsoft and Sony have reached an agreement to keep the popular Call of Duty franchise on PlayStation consoles, ending a months-long feud over Microsoft's proposed acquisition of Activision Blizzard.

The announcement was made by Phil Spencer, CEO of Microsoft Gaming, who tweeted about the agreement on Sunday morning.

The deal comes after Microsoft successfully defeated the US Federal Trade Commission's attempt to halt its $68.7 billion purchase of Activision Blizzard. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals denied the emergency stay requested by the regulator, allowing the deal to proceed in the US.

The United Kingdom's Markets and Competition Authority (CMA) remains the last regulator opposing the acquisition, but both Microsoft and the watchdog have agreed to pause their legal battle and negotiate a compromise.

Phil Spencer emphasized Microsoft's commitment to addressing the concerns of regulators, platform and game developers, and consumers throughout the acquisition process. He expressed the company's dedication to ensuring that Call of Duty remains available on multiple platforms, reaching more consumers than ever before.

The specific terms of the deal between Microsoft and Sony were not disclosed by Spencer. However, it was later confirmed by Stephen Totilo of Axios that the agreement spans a duration of 10 years. Microsoft initially offered Sony a 10-year deal at the end of last year to keep Call of Duty on PlayStation consoles, but the offer was declined at the time.