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8 Jun, 2023
1 min time to read

Scientists at the GW School of Medicine & Health Sciences have developed a remote-controlled pill-shaped camera, known as the NaviCam, that allows physicians to navigate the digestive system and diagnose potential issues.

This breakthrough technology offers a simpler and less invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy procedures.

Unlike existing ingestible video capsule endoscopes that rely on gravity and the digestive system for movement, the NaviCam can be remotely controlled by physicians. Equipped with an external magnet and video game style joysticks, doctors can maneuver the camera to visualize and photograph problem areas within the digestive tract.

The potential benefits of this technology are significant, as it can detect bleeding, inflammation, and lesions. It also has the capability to transmit videos and images off-site for further analysis and review.

During a pilot study conducted by Andrew Meltzer, a professor of Emergency Medicine, and his colleagues at medical technology company AnX Robotica, the NaviCam demonstrated promising results.

Out of the 40 participants in the study, physicians achieved a 95 percent success rate in accurately controlling the camera to major parts of the stomach and visualizing potential abnormalities. To validate the camera's effectiveness, these patients also underwent traditional endoscopy, which confirmed that no high-risk lesions were missed.

Researchers point this pilot testing program is still in the beginning stages.